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Overdue Comments Replies


I am in the process of changing my comments platform and will have to delete all my old comments. But I wanted to make sure that I responded to a few comments from the old platform since I think others will have some of the same questions. See comments and responses below:

Brenda from Singaporemathlive says, "Primary Mathematics 6 is an honors level Pre-Algebra course. Students who finish that level, including all of the books that I recommend, are fully prepared for Algebra I. That means that finishing PM6 by the end of 7th grade puts your student on the honors math track with Algebra I taken in the 8th grade and being prepared for Calculus I in their senior year. Finishing PM6 at the end of the 8th grade allows a student to be on the regular math track with Algebra I in the 9th grade and Pre-Calculus as the last math class in high school."

Also watch her video about whats next after Primary Math 6. She speaks about it start at about 1:15. Just enter your email to watch the video.

https://singaporemathlive.vids.io/videos/e89adab71916eec860/pm6-intro-mp4

I have actually held the Singapore 6 books in my hand and looked through them. I definitely don’t think its a 2 year course. My son has completed Singapore 5 and is 6th grade now so if we complete Singapore 6 in 6th grade, then what would we do for 7th? We wouldl have to find a pre-algebra for 7th, which I have found in Art of Problem Solving. Using Beast Academy in 6th (created by the Art of Problem Solving team) will help prepare him for AOPS’s way of doing things which is very different from Singapore. We plan to do AOPS Algebra 1 in 8th grade since my son in an advanced math student and that is on par with what the accelerated math classes in my community do for their advanced math students. Having reviewed Singapore 6, I simply don’t think it will get us where we are trying to go within our timeline.

Hello, I came across your article in an attempt to find supplemental programs for my kiddo for after school, summer and home practice. My kiddo is entering 2nd grade, reads at 3rd + and is reluctant at Math. I'm concerned that she will carry forward an :" I'm just bad at Math" attitude if I can't find something to support her outside of school. I feel that she might benefit from having an additional program to support her through elementary an above. I'd like to use a more structured math option. Do you think it would be wise to start her with Beast Academy? She is very responsive to visual story telling to promote learning. Kiddo enjoys reading semi graphic chapter books like Geronimo Stilton's Creepella series, Dragon Masters and such. Also, she keeps a journal of monsters that she's drawn - so it looks like Beast Academy would be a good "In". Any help would be appreciated. Regards Heather D

The key is to find out where the disconnect is with math. When my daughter started with the “I’m just bad at math” thing, I was able to discover that it was simply a matter of her not having yet mastered her math facts. Also, she cannot handle multiple ways of approaching problems (like the way math is presented with Common Core curricula). So I just use the standard algorithm for her and she can easily grasp the concept. So I think you first have to figure out where you child struggles. Then you can find a math proram to suit.

Beast is an advanced program and if you use it, keep in mind that it is meant to move very slowly. Whereas my son can do several exercises and problems in one sitting with Singapore, I do not assign him more than 10 problems in one sitting with Beast. Sometimes its only 5 problems. The problems require thinking and synthesizing of information. It starts off easy and then becomes progressively more challenging quickly. If you want to try it I would say try 1 guide and practice book that covers some of the topics your child will cover early on in the semester and then see how it goes. The guide books are very good at explaining and the practice books have additional explanations. You have to read ALL the words in order to successful at finding the solutions. My son always runs into trouble when he tries to skip reading ANY of the information provided, which he could do with Singapore.

I am wondering if you would consider making sources for teaching black history available as list? I would certainly be glad to purchase it. I have hard time getting a chance to listen to podcasts/downloads. Do you have written resources available for purchase? Thanks!

Yes! I am working on having something put together by the end of the year.

Dear Mrs Sardens,

Which Singapore math would you recommend first hand... Common Core, Standards Edition or US edition and why?

I don’t use anything that’s common core because I don’t think the standards are developmentally appropriate and because they were not developed by an appropriate group of people in a logical manner. Its about politics and money. I use the Standards edition over the US addition because it included units in probability, data analysis, negative numbers, and coordinate graphing, which were missing from the US version and because it is not Common Core.

#homeschool #singaporemath #beastacademy #blackhistory

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